Reflections

 

Reflections of. Reflections in. Reflections on. How different the world can seem when we notice only a portion of it. Shapes and colors are distorted in strange and wonderful ways depending on the reflecting medium. I like to describe it as shape shifting. The image is somewhat recognizable but somehow different from what we expect.

Some materials are highly reflective like antique cars in a museum, polished to a fare thee well, reflecting people passing by as well as their pricey neighbors.

Antique Car Museum

Antique Car Museum

Antique Car Museum

Antique Car Museum

If the car is outdoors its colorful surroundings are captured on its slick and shiny surface.

Santa Fe

Santa Fe

Sculptures, indoors and out, often have highly reflective surfaces which reflect museum goers, both those studying the sculpture and those photographing it. There is an otherworldly aspect to those reflections.

Jeff Koons

Jeff Koons

Donald Judd, Marfa

Donald Judd, Marfa

Loveland Sculpture Park, CO

Loveland Sculpture Park, CO

Glass has a way of capturing and altering what it reflects. Sometimes it reflects what is in the immediate vicinity. Sometimes it lets us see through it and beyond in multiple layers.

Winspear Opera House, Dallas

Winspear Opera House, Dallas

Broad Museum, LA

Broad Museum, LA

Crystal Bridges Museum, Arkansas

Crystal Bridges Museum, Arkansas

Trammel Crow Building, Dallas

Trammel Crow Building, Dallas

Glassware

Glassware

Metropolitan Museum of Art

Metropolitan Museum of Art

Water has its own special way of mesmerizing us with its reflections. This is shape shifting at its best. Wiggly, elusive images which change depending on the time of day and the light.

Venice Canals, CA

Venice Canals, CA

dsc_3756-copy-copy

The Modern, Ft. Worth, TX

The Modern, Ft. Worth, TX

The Modern, Ft. Worth, TX

The Modern, Ft. Worth, TX

Glacier National Park, Montana

Glacier National Park, Montana

Glacier National Park, Montana

Glacier National Park, Montana

Inside and out, buildings often present multiple images, reflection upon reflection.

Harpa Concert Hall, Reykjavik, Iceland

Harpa Concert Hall, Reykjavik, Iceland

Northpark Mall, Dallas

Northpark Mall, Dallas

dscn6942-copy-copy

Look at water and architecture for playful abstract patterns of shape and color.

img_6183

p1010159

dsc_3751

And now, YOUR photos! Thanks for letting us see what you see.

Elizabeth Greene - Libby

Elizabeth Greene – Libby

Marla Shanman - Rome

Marla Shainman – Rome

Moses Hoskins - Isfahan

Moses Hoskins – Isfahan

Stan Feld - Woodcreek Ranch, TX

Stan Feld – Woodcreek Ranch, TX

Phil Goodman

Phil Goodman

Next – Theme #4 is PLACE. It’s a word with many meanings. Literal or figurative. What’s your take on it? Get your photos ready and send them to me as email attachments no larger than 1MB JPG by January 4, 2017.

Urbanity

I didn’t think urbanity was a real word, but it is. urbanity – noun. urban life. What I had in mind for this theme was anything that gave us a sense of life in an urban setting. What is the feel of an urban space? What is the experience?

For me, it’s often people, lots of them. Crowded sidewalks, busy streets. People, traffic, noise. You sense the cacophony all around you.

Hanoi, Vietnam

Hanoi, Vietnam

Budapest, Hungary

Budapest, Hungary

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Florence, Italy

Florence, Italy

NYC

NYC

San Francisco, CA

San Francisco, CA

Ljubljana, Slovenia

Ljubljana, Slovenia

Sometimes the streets are devoid of people, but the architecture let’s you know it’s a cityscape.

NYC

NYC

 

Ephesus, Turkey

Ephesus, Turkey

Hanoi, Vietnam

Hanoi, Vietnam

The Modern, Ft. Worth, TX

The Modern, Ft. Worth, TX

Buenos Aires, Argentine

Buenos Aires, Argentina

Dallas, TX

Dallas, TX

Dallas, TX

Dallas, TX

Brooklyn Bridge, NYC

Brooklyn Bridge, NYC

High Line, NYC

High Line, NYC

London

London

Zagreb, Croatia

Zagreb, Croatia

Lisbon, Portugal

Lisbon, Portugal

NYC

NYC

 

A lot happens on the sidewalks of a big city. People make the sidewalk an extension of their home. They jam for us, they eat, they just hang out. They’re not always coming and going. The camaraderie belies the anonymity of urban life.

Budapest, Hungary

Budapest, Hungary

Rome, Italy

Rome, Italy

Barcelona, Spain

Barcelona, Spain

Calafate, Argentina

Calafate, Argentina

NYC

NYC

NYC

NYC

 

Here are some of YOUR photos! I am delighted to include them. Thanks for sharing your view of “urbanity.” You’ve made our day a little more interesting.

Bruce Schlein

Bruce Schlein

Elizabeth Greene - Fishfry

Elizabeth Greene – Fish Fry

Moses Hawkins - Florence

Moses Hawkins – Florence

Audrey Greene

Audrey Greene

Robert Weitz - Chicago

Robert Weitz – Chicago

Theme #3 is “Reflections.” Gather up those photos and send them to me as email attachments, smaller than 1MG, by November 21, 2016.

 

Markets – Fleas & Farmers’

Farmers’ Markets can be found all over the world. You probably have one in your home town. Some, like the Triana Market in Seville, Spain, are indoors. Here, vendors stack their fruits and veggies in beautiful arrangements surrounded by tile walls naming their spaces.

Triana Market, Seville

Triana Market, Seville

Fish!

Triana Market, Seville

Triana Market, Seville

Most markets are outdoors, spring through fall. From Boulder, Colorado and Portland, Oregon to far flung places like India, Ljubljiana (Slovenia), Turkey and Vietnam, markets are here, there, and everywhere. The intersection of people and commerce is always a lively event.

Boulder Tomatoes

Boulder Tomatoes

High Finances-Portland

High Finances-Portland

Ljubljiana Lady

Ljubljiana Lady

Turkey Market

Turkey

Vietnam Street Market

Vietnam Street Market

Vietnam Peppers-Street Market

Vietnam Street Market

India

India

Flea markets are a little different. Wander around a flea market and you’ll find a little bit of everything, cheap or dear, junk or “junque.” Something old, something new. There are treasures every week at the San Telmo market in Buenos Aires. Closer to home one can find the fun and funky by the side of the river in Redstone, Colorado. On the street or inside there is something for everyone.

San Telmo Market-Buenos Aires

San Telmo Market-Buenos Aires

San Telmo Market-Buenos Aires

San Telmo Market-Buenos Aires

Redstone, Colorado

Redstone, Colorado

Tangier, Morocco

Tangier, Morocco

Casablanca

Casablanca

India

India

Minturn, Colorado

Minturn, Colorado

Alaska

Alaska

Turkey

Turkey

Thanks to all of you who sent me photos for this theme. Here are a few which, for me, capture the theme’s spirit.

Bruce Schlein M.D.

Bruce Schlein

Al Padwa

Al Padwa

Ginger Mynatt

Ginger Mynatt

Next up – Theme #2 – “Urbanity.” Lots of room for interpretation. Send me an email with attached jpg files, no larger than 1MB each by October 24, 2016.

What’s Underfoot or Looking Down Can Be Rewarding

I will be exhibiting photographs from my “Underfoot” series at Ilume Gallerie in Dallas from June 17 – July 16, 2016. The show features a variety of subject matter from a diverse group of photographers.

Here are several from that series which focus attention on what lies beneath our feet. The streets and sidewalks everywhere show human presence in their markings and signage. Many have an abstract quality to them. Some are explicit some are not. They are always colorful.

I’ve selected a few for this pre-show peek.

Underfoot Edwards, CO

Underfoot Edwards, CO

Underfoot Dallas, TX

Underfoot Dallas, TX

Underfoot NYC

Underfoot NYC

Underfoot Boulder, CO

Underfoot Boulder, CO

Underfoot Greenville, SC

Underfoot Greenville, SC

Underfoot NYC

Underfoot NYC

The Opening Reception is Friday June 17, 6-9pm

Ilume Gallerie

4123 Cedar Springs, Suite 107

Dallas, TX 75219

www.ilumegallerie.com

Hope to see you there!

 

NYC – It’s All About The Food

New York in the spring can bring any kind of weather even snow, which was predicted for the day we left the city. The floral dresses and short sleeves of a few weeks ago were replaced for a day or two with basic black, puffy coats and umbrellas. Temperatures ranged from 70 to 38 with a little rain and wind for good measure. Our preferred mode of travel in NYC is walking, followed by the subway and bus when necessary.

Spring has sprung!

Spring has sprung!

A big part of the New York experience is food. Different neighborhoods, different ethnic inspired foods. What variety! It’s a true melting pot. The Lower East Side has been home to many immigrant groups, each contributing to the ever changing food landscape. Gentrification is occurring in the area (boutique hotels replacing tenement apartment buildings, skyrocketing rents) but some things never change. Or haven’t, yet.

NYC Lower East Side

NYC Lower East Side

Changes Occur

Changes Occur

NYC Lower East Side

NYC Lower East Side

We joined a group with Free Tours By Foot for a glimpse, actually a taste, of mostly Jewish Eastern European culinary delights on their Lower East Side itinerary.

First stop – Yonah Schimmel’s Knish Bakery, a neighborhood staple since 1910, founded by a Romanian immigrant, who first peddled his wares in Coney Island. How does one describe a “knish?” Mashed potato wrapped in dough doesn’t quite do it justice. It must be eaten hot! Huge. Enough for several people. An egg cream chaser hit the spot. This favorite drink from my NY childhood has neither eggs nor cream. It’s a fountain drink that does not come in a bottle. Whole milk is added to chocolate syrup, followed by a careful addition of cold seltzer (soda water). Stir! Sip! Yum!

Yonah Schimmel's

Yonah Schimmel’s

 

Yonah Schimmel's

Yonah Schimmel’s

 

Have A Knish

Have A Knish

We stopped at Russ and Daughters, but did not partake. R & D was founded 100 years ago and is still going strong. The emphasis is on pickled and smoked fish but there are many other items on the menu. Believe it or not, recipes are on their website.

Russ & Daughters

Russ & Daughters

 

Russ & Daughters

Russ & Daughters

Judging by the crowds in Katz’s delicatessen, everyone who comes to New York eats there. It was a mad house so we didn’t stay to have one of their famous mile high pastrami sandwiches. This NY institution was founded in 1888. It’s where “Harry Met Sally.”

Katz's Deli

Katz’s Deli

At The Pickle Guys barrels and barrels of pickled goodies (not just pickles) beckon. There were many pickle stores on Essex Street at the turn of the 20th century. Stanley Feld warmly reminisces about “Jake, the pickle man.” Today, there is only the The Pickle Guys.

Pickles Galore!

Pickles Galore!

C & C Prosperity Dumplings has branched out from its original location in Chinatown. The dumplings are made to order and include vegetarian options. Delicious!

A Whole Lot of Dumplings

A Whole Lot of Dumplings

As if we weren’t full enough we had to have a doughnut at Doughnut Plant, our last stop. It was hard to choose. There were filled (jam, cream, custard), yeast, Tres Leches, and Blackout, among them. We went with the Valrone chocolate covered. A gourmet doughnut!

Everyone Loves Doughnuts

Everyone Loves Doughnuts

The nice thing about Free Tours By Foot is that you only pay for what you eat, a little or a lot. A gratuity for the guide is appreciated.

The Devil Is In The Details

 

Robert Rauschenberg once said, “Sunsets and strawberries never appear the same.” Margaret Drabble wrote, in The Red Queen, “Nothing comes from nowhere.”

#1274 Razzle, Dazzle, collage 19 1:2x25 1:2"

#1274 Razzle, Dazzle, collage 19 1:2×25 1:2″

 

#1275 Hip, Hip, Hooray, collage 19 1:2x25 1:2" 20

#1275 Hip, Hip, Hooray, collage 19 1:2×25 1:2″ 20

When I think about my work (because people ask) I realize it is always about exploring possibilities. Sometimes it’s moving forward, sometimes it’s stepping back. Inspiration can come from anything and anywhere, as complicated as the arc of travel, as simple as the mash up of colors in a bowl of fruit salad. A story, a piece of fabric, architectural details. How do I process all of these sensory experiences? How do I express them?

It’s a balancing act. Assessing, revising, adding, subtracting. The paintings and collages, for instance, are the result of the interplay of line, texture (real or implied), negative and positive space, and color (or lack of). How do the parts relate to the whole?

Where is the harmony? The dissonance? Experience with materials and technique is layered over intuition.

#1276 Going My Way?, collage 19 1:2x25 1:2"

#1276 Going My Way?, collage 19 1:2×25 1:2″

#1277 It Takes Longer Than You Think, collage 19 1:2x25 1:2"

#1277 It Takes Longer Than You Think, collage 19 1:2×25 1:2″

 

One person’s “serious” is another person’s “playful.” What are the connections within a work and to others that form a series? Must it tell a story or can you connect with it on a different level? Do you seek out metaphors as you study it? “… the eye of the beholder” may sound trite but it’s important to note that you, the viewer, bring much to the work to help you understand it.

#1278 Taking The High Road, collage 19 1:2x25 1:2"

#1278 Taking The High Road, collage 19 1:2×25 1:2″

 

#1279 Flights of Fancy, collage 19 1:2x251:2"

#1279 Flights of Fancy, collage 19 1:2×251:2″

 

I have no control over how viewers will interpret or connect with my work. I give up control once I determine it is finished. Then, on to the next.

#1281 Rational Exuberance 2, acrylic painting on paper with collage 22x30"

#1281 Rational Exuberance 2, acrylic painting on paper with collage 22×30″

You can find more collages, plus paintings, prints and photographs on my website www.studio7310.com. Have at it!

P.S. If you subscribe to my blog it will go straight to your inbox.

Autumn Along The Oregon Coast

To get to Ashland, Oregon and the Oregon Shakespeare Festival (OSF) Stanley and I decided to go by way of the Oregon coast. We started in Portland, headed south along the coast, then turned east to Ashland, stopping at several beach towns along the way.

Portland has a lot to offer within a reasonable walking distance from downtown. It’s reputation as a “foodie” town is well founded. For drinking and driving try the Brewcycle (we did not). Fortunately, there seemed to be an “official” driver. What a fun way to get around!

IMG_6161 Portland copy copy

There are restaurants and food trucks galore. Dessert, anyone?

P1020056 copy copyP1020073 copy copy

Not all the art in Portland resides in its museums. I saw two very different walls. One might have been commissioned, the other probably not.

P1020068 copy copyP1020076 copy copy

Some street markings for my “Underfoot” theme.

IMG_6165 Portland copy copyP1020060 copy copy

The BIG Saturday market reminded me of the Arlo Guthrie song “You Can Get Anything You Want At ….” It’s under and around the bridge and near the river. It was a perfect day for shoppers and vendors alike. Colorful wares, busy sellers and musicians playing jazzy tunes. What could be better?

P1020082 copy copyP1020096 copy copyP1020078 copy copyP1020079 copy copyP1020118 copy copyP1020083 copy copy

Leaving Portland we made our way to the coast. First stop – Astoria, on the banks of the Columbia River. It is the oldest American community west of the Mississippi. There is a lot of Lewis and Clark history about. Our hotel was at the water’s edge, almost under the Astoria-Megler bridge which connects to Washington state. Miss the turn to the hotel and you are in Washington. We did.

P1020128 copy copyP1020170 copy copy

Astoria is a port town. We took in the sights along the waterfront, walking to the center of town. We couldn’t have asked for more beautiful weather. The birds were happy, too.

P1020138 copy copyP1020148 copy copy

To the coast! Cannon Beach is charming, at its best without the summer crowds. Shops, restaurants and art galleries to explore.

P1020183 Cannon Beach copy copyP1020189 copy copy

We walked the almost deserted beach at sunset. The changing colors of the sea and sky transfixed us. It was a show just for the two of us.

P1020211 copy copyP1020229 copy copyP1020225 copy copyP1020246 copy copyP1020259 copy copy

Newport next. A beach town whose waterfront is an interesting combination of industry (fishing) and shops and restaurants for tourists. It’s a bit “gritty”, not all gussied up. A walk along the water revealed this combination, plus a little funk.

P1020268 Newport copy copyP1020275 copy copyP1020283 copy copyP1020287 copy copyP1020305 copy copyP1020311 copy copyP1020300 copy copy

P1020295 copy copy

On to Ashland, our last stop, where we explored the town and markets each day before heading to the evening’s play at OSF. Remember the reason for the trip? BTW OSF is not only Shakespeare.

IMG_6189 OSF copy copyIMG_6210 Ashland copy copyIMG_6192 copy copyIMG_6195 copy copy

Jacksonville is close by and offers offices, shops and restaurants (more eating!) in well-preserved 19th century buildings.

P1020342 copy copy

I even found some “ghost” signs like this one, a reminder of things past.

P1020337 copy copy

It was hard to leave Oregon. Another time, another trip.

Portland OR copy copy

 

When Walls Need Painting

 

The house settles a bit. This is Dallas, after all. The soil is slightly unstable. Cracks appear in the walls. They’re easy to ignore for a while. Then the painter has to be called. That painter. The one who can tape, bed, texture and paint.

I had ignored the cracks in my studio walls and ceiling for too long, mainly because I dreaded the task of shifting large canvases and “stuff” to other parts of the studio. It took a bit of thinking to figure out which other parts of the studio could be the recipients. This is my Dallas studio, the second story of the house we built in 1972. I’ve worked here all through the years my kids were growing up, through grad school (University of North Texas – MFA) and a variety of art and non- art related work experiences.

The studio has served me well. It was primarily a painting studio. I was exposed to printmaking in graduate school. I loved it and continued with it later by taking courses at one of the local community colleges. The MacDowell Colony accepted me for printmaking and I spent almost a month there in my own studio with my very own press. I longed to have one but knew the floor upstairs couldn’t handle the weight.

My dream came through in 2000 when we built an art studio at our farm north of Dallas. I designed the studio to accommodate a large Takach etching press. Takach presses are handmade in Albuquerque NM and are beautiful machines. The studio is large and well lit and I can also paint, make collages and use my computer and printer for my photography.

As I moved things around in preparation for the painters I realized how much “stuff” an artist collects. I’m sure I’m not the only one. Not quite hoarders, but close. Cardboard and bubble wrap. Frames, frames and more frames. A roll of canvas so large and heavy I can hardly move it, but hey, it cost less per foot that way, right?

An unexpected delight came from moving the paintings. I saw paintings like this one I had not seen in years.

When Changes Occur acrylic painting, 53x68", 1987

When Changes Occur  acrylic painting, 53×68″, 1987

Those who know me know I have been a lifelong knitter. You knitters know about the ever growing “yarn stash.” I have that, too. I’m announcing my goal to not put back every single item once the painters are finished. Donate or throw away. I hope.

Meanwhile, here a few pictures of the studio as it looks during this transition.

IMG_6220 copy IMG_6221 copy IMG_6219 copy IMG_6222 copy IMG_6223 copy IMG_6224 copy IMG_6229 copy IMG_6227 copy IMG_6228 copyAny volunteers for putting things back?

 

 

Mills & More

I recently spent a long weekend in Greenville, SC with good friends Bruce and Alice Schlein. I was there to attend the opening of “Surfaces and Spaces: Photography of Cecelia Feld & Bruce Schlein”, our exhibit at the Pickens County Museum, about thirty miles from Greenville.

Bruce gave us a tour of the area between Greenville and Spartenburg which was once home to a large number of thriving textile mills, now mostly in various stages of decrepitude. The remains of these large buildings make interesting photographic subjects. Some of them are experiencing new life as condominium buildings.

Bradford Mills, for example, is undergoing renovation. The finished part is now the Greenville Center for Creative Arts (GCCA) with classrooms and exhibition spaces. It is a welcome addition to the Greenville Arts scene. The rest of the mill will be condos.

Beautiful old glass and window fittings in the GCCA make the space special.

Brandon Mills-Inside GCCA

Brandon Mills-Inside GCCA

 

GCCA

GCCA

Another mill, Glendale Mills in Spartenburg, occupied a large area on the water at Glendale Shoals. The remains of one of the buildings and foundations of others give one a sense of how large this complex was.

Glendale Mills

Glendale Mills

Glendale Shoals

Glendale Shoals

Glendale Shoals

Glendale Shoals

Glendale Mills

Glendale Mills

 

Glendale Mills

Glendale Mills

Glendale Mills

Glendale Mills

So much for the Mills. Now, for the “More.”

Here are a few more of Bruce’s graffiti laden walls. As I notice and photograph markings and notations on streets and sidewalks near and far, Bruce’s discerning eye lights on walls and spaces filled with all kinds of drawings and symbols. In his photos the whole is greater than the sum of its parts, but look closely at the details.

Bruce Schlein

Bruce Schlein

Bruce Schlein

Bruce Schlein

Bruce Schlein

Bruce Schlein

Bruce Schlein

Bruce Schlein

 Bruce Schlein

Bruce Schlein

Here are a few more of my “Underfoot” photos from the exhibit. They are a bit more minimal than Bruce’s.

Cecelia Feld

Cecelia Feld

Cecelia Feld

Cecelia Feld

Cecelia Feld

Cecelia Feld

Cecelia Feld

Cecelia Feld

Cecelia Feld

Cecelia Feld

I hope those of you who live in the area will see the show which is up until August 20. Spend some time with cool art on a hot summer day.

 

Pickens County Museum

307 Johnson St.

Pickens, SC 29671

(864) 898-5963

www.pickenscountymuseum.org

In Plain Sight

I am thrilled to be sharing the walls of the Pickens County Museum with my good friend of many years (notice I didn’t say “old friend”) Bruce Schlein. How a guy from New Jersey and a gal from New York came to spend most of their adult life in the south is a story for another day.

We are joining forces to present an exhibit called Surfaces and Spaces: Photography of Cecelia Feld and Bruce Schlein, which shows the interest we share in documenting particular aspects of our environment. Both of us like surfaces. I like city streets (horizontal planes). Bruce goes more for walls and fences (verticals). He also has an uncanny knack and a well-honed eye for finding hidden and often forgotten spaces.

Bruce’s photos of graffiti on walls explode with color and drama. His interiors are transformed by the quality of light hitting them.

Here are a few from Bruce that will be in the show.

Bruce graffiti 1Bruce graffiti 2Bruce graffiti 3Bruce graffiti 4

Bruce graffiti 5

People and places, near and far, are my subjects. My “Underfoot” series of photos came about when I started to notice how much of our environment had signage or other markings on streets and sidewalks. Every city in every country I’ve traveled to shows this kind of human presence.

Like these.

1. Edwards,CO 0819392. Dallas,TX DSCN7382 copy a.9. Vail,CO IMG_3645

10. San Fran,CA IMG_2084

Many of the marks have an abstract quality to them. Colorful lines, shapes and squiggles are drawn or painted on neutral backgrounds. They make me stop. What do they say about who was here?

6. NYC IMG_09707. NYC IMG_3988 copy15. Dallas,TX IMG_1282 copy17. NYC IMG_399318. Dallas,TX 075359

 

 

The Opening Reception is Saturday, June 27, 1-4pm

Pickens Museum of Art & History

307 Johnson St.

Pickens, SC 29671

(864) 898-5963

The exhibit runs through August 20

Y’all come!