New York City – After Dark

 

10 days. 240 hours. NYC – the city that never sleeps. Not an understatement. 42nd St., Times Square, Broadway. Always crowded with people coming and going – to the theater, to restaurants, to stores, or just coming and going. Any night, in good weather, seems like New Year’s Eve.

20130928_211457 Botero copy20140927_211707 Columbus Circle copy20141001_215632 copy

The Great White Way is a sea of neon. What would you like to buy? Where would you like to go? What would you like to eat, drink, drive? It’s up there in lights. Everyone, and I mean everyone, is taking pictures. Give us a warm fall evening, a camera or a phone, and we’re on it!

20140926_192357 Times Square copy20140926_192711 copy20140926_192955 copy20140926_192939 copy20140926_193751 copy20140926_193730 copy

Off the street, high up, Dizzy’s Club Coca Cola, at Lincoln Center, offers up some of the best jazz in town.

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11PM. Let’s not forget to find a spot away from the madding crowd to replenish and prepare for another day.

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This concludes my three blogs on NYC Fall 2014. Scroll down for #1 and #2. It will be nice to remember as winter takes hold and the scenes change.

Happy traveling!

New York City – Food & Fashion

10 days. 240 hours. Man (or woman) does not live by bread alone. Certainly not in NYC. You can fuel up anywhere, anytime, day or night, with anything your heart desires. Street vendors, who now add middle eastern falafel, Mexican tacos and gluten-free offerings to the standard hot dog (with everything, please) and pretzel (warm, with salt, please) are everywhere.

IMG_5258Waverly Diner Greenwich Vllge copyIMG_5078 copy20140927_213249 copyIMG_5176 copy

You can even eat “heart healthy.” Grab and go fruit!

IMG_5206 copy

While there is a Starbuck’s on almost every corner, there are still coffee shops like Reggio’s in Greenwich Village. Reggio’s feels like a comfy living room and makes a damn good cappuccino. We took a Food Tour of Greenwich Village with Free Tours on Foot. Really free! You can give a gratuity to the guide at the end. Our young guide gave us some history of the area as we ate our way through fresh, hot falafel, artichoke pizza (no kidding), bagel buns filled with all kinds of cream cheese, which I managed to squirt all over myself, and dessert, yummy. In the rain. It was the only rainy day in 10, but who cared?

20141004_112605 Greenwich Vllge copy20141004_113845 Artichoke Pizza  copy20141004_120930 Bantam Bagels copy20141004_124418 copy

If food is everywhere, so is fashion. High and low. There is something for everyone. Buyer beware!

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At the end of a busy day – libations!

IMG_5138 copyIMG_5290 libations copy

Blog #3 – After Dark, coming soon. Last, but not least.

 

Showtime at Ilume Gallerie

This body of work consists of collages on paper and mixed media acrylic paintings. I recycle parts of my monotype and collagraph original prints and photographs with found paper from various sources. The collages and paintings are non-objective; the emphasis is on the relationship of line, color, shape and texture.

Working in one medium, i.e. monotype prints, usually leads me down another path because I’m always asking myself “what if?” What if I limit my color palette, what if I work in a more minimal way or, on the other hand, how about excessive exuberance? Large or small? Paint or paper? Or both. Anything can spark an idea – something seen, heard, imagined. There are always new avenues to explore.

Looking down can be rewarding. My “Underfoot” series of photos started when I had my head down and noticed the interesting abstract pattern of street and sidewalk marks made by construction workers. We seldom pay attention to such marks but they resonated with me and I began to photograph them wherever I traveled.

Combining my prints (re-purposed etchings, monotypes, collagraphs) with found paper to create collages took my work in a different direction. Cutting up and adding the “Underfoot” photos seemed like a logical next step. Their abstract quality echoes that of the other elements in the collage.

Sometimes I assemble the collage on painted paper. The acrylic painting weaves its way in and around the collage. Negative space and positive space play games with one another. The group of collages in this exhibit called “Springtime Suite” is colorful and energetic and was inspired by a visit to the Dallas Arboretum when it was ablaze with color.

Here are the “Springtime Suite” collages in this exhibit.

#1259 Springtime Suite 1, acrylic painting on paper with collage, 22x30"

#1259 Springtime Suite 1, acrylic painting on paper with collage, 22×30″

 #1260 Springtime Suite 2, acrylic painting on paper with collage, 22x30"

#1260 Springtime Suite 2, acrylic painting on paper with collage, 22×30″

#1263 Springtime Suite 5, acrylic painting on paper with collage, 30x22"

#1263 Springtime Suite 5, acrylic painting on paper with collage, 30×22″

I love to travel and have a large collection of paper maps. Remember those? I decided to use them in my collages. Instead of cutting them up I photographed them, enlarged segments in the computer and printed them out. I cut them up and they became part of the collage series “Have Map Will Travel.”

Here are some in the exhibit.

#1272 Have Map Will Travel 4, collage, 30x22"

#1272 Have Map Will Travel 4, collage, 30×22″

#1273 Have Map Will Travel 5, collage, 30x22"

#1273 Have Map Will Travel 5, collage, 30×22″

 

The mixed media paintings are whirlwinds of line, color and texture.

#1269 Untitled, mixed media acrylic painting on panel, 30x30"

#1269 Untitled, mixed media acrylic painting on panel, 30×30″

 

#1270 Untitled mixed media acrylic painting on panel, 30x30"

#1270 Untitled mixed media acrylic painting on panel, 30×30″

#1271 Untitled mixed media acrylic painting on panel, 30x30"

#1271 Untitled mixed media acrylic painting on panel, 30×30″

 

 

The show runs through November 29 at Ilume Gallerie, Dallas, Texas.

Catch it if you can!

 

 

 

 

 

New York City-Art & Architecture

10 days. 240 hours. Uptown, downtown, all around the town. NYC is still, very much, a city of neighborhoods. It’s a city that invites you to explore as much as you can on foot or by subway (the fastest way to get around). A Metro card with unlimited rides on trains or buses for one week will set you back only $30.00, not as cheap as it used to be, but still a bargain compared to taxi cabs.

Instead of exploring NYC in one blog, I will write several (3), each one focusing on a different aspect of my recent trip.

Art is everywhere. From kitsch in store windows and graffiti,

20140926_192047(0) copy IMG_5150 copy

to this display by artist Korakrit Arunanondaci. “My Trip to the White Temple” is like a lacy cut out with a video in the center which changed as you watched and reflected the traffic passing by. I could have walked right by without noticing. It was magical.

20140929_132822 copyThere is art on the High Line, but as I looked down at the apartment buildings, this sculpture by Charlie Hewitt caught my eye.

IMG_5277 Charlie Hewitt copy

The architecture of the Metropolitan Museum of Art is noteworthy and so is the art inside. There is often a temporary exhibit on the rooftop garden. Besides the exhibit, the views of the city above the treetops in Central Park are spectacular. The current site-specific installation is “Hedge Two-Way Mirror Walkabout” by Dan Graham with Gunther Vogt, a Swiss landscape architect. Steel curves hold panels of two-way mirrored glass. The garden maze of reflections was fun for adults (mostly taking selfies) and kids running in and out.

IMG_5080 Met. Museum of Art copyIMG_5090 copyIMG_5093 copyIMG_5096 copy

NYC always feels like a construction zone. Old coming down, new going up. Different times, different styles.

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At the risk of being labeled “tourist” (which I am), I always look up (when not looking down). Often, several architectural styles bump up against each other like these along the High Line. There is one block in mid-town where I counted six different styles next to each other.

IMG_5272 High Line 3 styles copyIMG_5118 copy copy

Patterns inside and outside are there for the taking. Greenwich Village, with its narrow streets and old buildings (now commanding sky-high rents) still feels like a “village.” It’s that NYC “neighborhood” thing. A quick subway ride to Christopher St. puts you right there. At its heart is Washington Square Park with its distinctive arch.

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IMG_5100 Apple Store copyIMG_5260 Washington Sq Park copy

The area around the 9/11 Memorial is still under construction, but the Freedom Tower is finished and is reflected in the nearby building.

IMG_5219 Freedom Tower NYC copy

So much to see, so little time.

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Blog #2 – Food & Fashion, coming soon!

Opening In Dallas

On November 1, 2014 I will be meeting and greeting at the opening reception for my next exhibit. It’s at Ilume Gallerie on Cedar Springs near Oak Lawn in Dallas.

The exhibit consists of collages on acrylic painted paper from the “Springtime Suite” series and collages from the “Have Map Will Travel” series. I’ll also be exhibiting several mixed media acrylic paintings on panel. It’s a high-energy show with lots of color and movement in each piece – so get your groove on!

Here’s the info:  Illume Gallerie

4123 Cedar Springs, suite 107 (next to Dish restaurant)

Dallas, TX 75219

214-507-7369

Opening Reception – Saturday November 1, 2014 7-10pm

Check out one of the paintings in the exhibit.

#1269 Untitled, mixed media acrylic painting on panel, 24x24", 2013

#1269 Untitled, mixed media acrylic painting on panel, 24×24″, 2013

 

 

 

Along The Adriatic

Culture and conflicts. The countries along the Adriatic coast showed us the richness of their heritage and gave us insight into some of the most horrific events of the twentieth century. These countries of the former Yugoslavia, Croatia, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Montenegro and Slovenia, have to different degrees moved (or crept) toward economic independence and political stability. It has not been easy given the ancient ethnic and religious tensions, which boiled over in the 1990’s.

Our journey hit the major spots, Dubrovnik in Croatia, way down at its southern tip, Sarajevo where all hell broke loose in the 90’s, Zagreb Croatia’s modern capital, and Slovenia’s fabled university town Ljubljana (yes, its harder to spell than pronounce).

There is so much more to this part of Europe than the capital cities. I’ll take you there as we hop skipped from Croatia to B&H, back to Croatia and then to Slovenia.

Dubrovnik (Latin name Ragusa), a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is perhaps the best-known and most visited city in Croatia. The ramparts encircling the Old Town can be walked (we did) and afford views down into the fortified town center on one side, the Adriatic on the other.

View From City Walls-Dubrovnik

View From City Walls-Dubrovnik

View From City Walls-Dubrovnik

View From City Walls-Dubrovnik

 

Inside City Walls-Dubrovnk

Inside City Walls-Dubrovnk 

Every city and town we visited had its markets and Dubrovnik was no exception.

Market-Dubrovnik

Market-Dubrovnik

A side trip to Kotor, Montenegro gave us a chance to wander the streets of the beautifully preserved medieval walled town.

Kotor-Montenegro

Kotor-Montenegro 

We made our way inland toward Sarajevo, capital of Bosnia & Herzegovina, stopping at Mostar. Mostar’s 16th c. historic bridge, destroyed in 1993 during the breakup of Yugoslavia, was rebuilt in 2004 and is a major tourist attraction. The Old Town along the river is, too.

Mostar-Bosnia & Herzegovina

Mostar-Bosnia & Herzegovina 

Old Town-Mostar

Old Town-Mostar

It’s not hard to find evidence of the war.

Mostar, B&H

Mostar, B&H

Visiting the restored Sarajevo of today, it’s hard to imagine the toll the three and a half year siege of the early 1990’s took on its citizens. A rainy day seemed appropriate to ponder that time, not so long ago.

Sarajevo

Sarajevo 

Back in Croatia we spent time in Split before heading to Zagreb, Croatia’s modern capital. Split is another Adriatic seaside gem. The big draw here, in addition to the port and promenade, is the Old Town and the Palace of Diocletian (Roman), his not-so-shabby “retirement” residence.

Split-Harbor

Split-Harbor

Palace of Diocletian-Split

Palace of Diocletian-Split

Palace of Diocletian-Courtyard

Palace of Diocletian-Courtyard

Zagreb, a busy and bustling city of 800,000 is divided into an upper and lower town, meeting at the Square of Ban Jelacic, a popular gathering place with trams coming and going. The large Dolac Market had everything.

Zagreb-Ban Jelacic Square

Zagreb-Ban Jelacic Square

Zagreb-Square

Zagreb-Square

 

Zagreb-Square

Zagreb-Square

 

Zagreb-Market

Zagreb-Market

Zagreb-Market

Zagreb-Market

About an hour from Zagreb, near the Slovenian border, is the charming town of Samobor where people from Zagreb go to unwind (or whatever else they do to get away from the city). A short hike took us to the remains of a castle. Coffee and cream cake were the hiker’s reward.

Castle Near Samobor, Croatia

Castle Near Samobor, Croatia

Castle Near Samobor, Croatia

Castle Near Samobor, Croatia

Croatia’s natural beauty reveals itself in the 114 square mile Plivitice Lakes National Park where we hiked to see one of its many waterfalls.

Plivitice Lakes, Croatia

Plivitice Lakes, Croatia 

We made our way to Slovenia and stayed at the seaside town of Lovran, Croatia. Its long waterfront promenade is perfect for walking off the gelato that called to us across the street from our hotel. We never pass up a gelateria!

Lovran, Croatia

Lovran, Croatia

While staying in Lovran we explored some of the hill towns of Istria, a part of Croatia across the water from Italy. Motovun is the largest, Hum the smallest.

Motovun, Istria (Croatia)

Motovun, Istria (Croatia)

Hum, Istria (Croatia)

Hum, Istria (Croatia)

Last stop – Ljubljana, capital of Slovenia. It’s a university town so it has a youthful, upbeat vibe. It has historical monuments, cultural attractions, exquisite architecture and markets. There is a lot of activity in and around the main square and  Old Town, both lined with shops and cafes.

Ljubljana - Square

Ljubljana – Square

 

Galerija Emporium-Ljub.

Galerija Emporium-Ljub.

 

Ljubljana

Ljubljana

Ljub.- Market

Ljub.- Market

Ljub.- Market

Ljub.- Market

We end our trip here having spent time exploring the majors, the minors and the in-betweens, all enlightening and enriching.

 

 

 

 

Asia In Dallas

The Crow Collection of Asian Art sits squarely in the Dallas Arts District, a neighbor of the Dallas Museum of Art and the Nasher Sculpture Center. The collection, amassed by Trammell and Margaret Crow, is housed in the office building that bears his name and contains art and artifacts from China, Japan, Korea, India and Indonesia.

The recent opening of the Sculpture Garden at the Crow Collection upped the ante in the district quite a bit. Many years in the making, the new garden contains twelve artworks from the 9th to the 21st centuries. They are outdoors in the newly landscaped and very beautiful Japanese inspired garden, which winds around the exterior of the building one level above the street.

The blending of old and new is evident as soon as you approach the Flora Street entrance. Off to one side, on the sidewalk, is one of three commissioned sculptures by contemporary Chinese artists. Liu Yonggang’s “Buddha” is an in your face, 18-foot-tall, lipstick red steel sculpture that shows a connection to traditional calligraphy without depicting a particular “character.” It’s a marvelous interplay of solids and negative spaces, a simple, yet commanding, presence.

Buddha

Buddha

Buddha - detail

Buddha – detail

The “Deified Laozi”, sitting at the foot of the entrance stairs, is a bronze sculpture from 17th century Ming China. It is quite a contrast to “Buddha.” You pass it as you ascend the stairs leading up to the sculpture garden where you begin your leisurely stroll among the other sculptures.

Deified Laozi

Deified Laozi

Deified Laozi - detail

Deified Laozi – detail

This bronze “Bell”  from Japan’s Edo period is struck with a large piece of wood instead of a clapper.

Bell

Bell 

I wound my way around the building, enjoying the well thought out areas of plantings, rocks and stones and came upon another striking contemporary sculpture by Qin Feng. His “Shi of East & West” is massive. It relates to the traditional use of pairs of carved stone lions as guardians outside entrances in China. These stone lions have been cut in half and separated, each half attached to a piece of plate glass etched with calligraphic brushwork. Looking through the open areas of the glass I could see the cityscape beyond. Simply magical!

Shi of East & West

Shi of East & West

Shi of East & West

Shi of East & West

Shi of East & West

Shi of East & West

Shi of East & West

Shi of East & West 

The sculptures are placed on either side of the Ross Avenue entrance to the building, itself a striking piece of architecture.

Trammell Crow Building

Trammell Crow Building

The third commissioned piece is “Sweepers” by Wang Shugang, another Chinese artist. Three life size bronze sculptures depict Tibetan monks in the act of sweeping. One is bright red and two are black. They are anonymous and meditative.

Sweepers

Sweepers 

Sweepers

Sweepers

There is a specially commissioned (non permanent) piece inside the building, which is not to be missed. Ma Jun is a Chinese artist, who comments on the consumerism taking hold in China in his “New China” series of objects, including cars. He paints the surface in a detailed style traditionally used for ceramics. “china.porsche”, a Porsche 911 carved in wood, then cast in fiberglass has incredible detail painted all over it. Catch it while you can (to May 24).

china.porsche

china.porsche

china.porsche

china.porsche 

The Crow’s Sculpture Garden can be enjoyed any time of year. It is a respite from the hustle and bustle of downtown Dallas and is FREE and open to the public. Nice!

 

 

 

 

Collage 101

 

When it comes to making collages my mantra is re-cycle, re-purpose, re-use. If “all’s fair in love and war”, so it is with collage making. There are as many ways to make a collage (2D, 3D, mixed) as there are materials.

(Definition: Collage derives its name from the French verb coller, to glue. The work of art is made by gluing things to the surface).

I start with the scary white paper. Blank. Nada. 100% rag, acid free, often Rives BFK, a lovely, heavy paper excellent for general printmaking.

Rives BFK paper 22x30"

Rives BFK paper 22×30″ 

Sometimes I start by painting on the paper with acrylic paint or making a monotype.

acrylic painted paper

acrylic painted paper

Next comes stash busting. I peruse all manner of my previous prints (etchings, monotypes, collagraphs). The un-wanted. Un-loved. I sort through ephemera.

bits and pieces

bits and pieces

 

discarded prints

discarded prints

ephemera

ephemera

Peruse, then pick. Decide on shapes. Cut out. Add, subtract, shift around, overlap. Build layers. Do not glue down. Changes might have to be made. Do not sneeze or jostle.

Here is the collage in progress with a few details.

collage in progress

collage in progress

 

detail

detail

detail

detail

Time to glue down all of those little pieces. To help me remember where they all go once they are lifted off the paper I make a few sketches with notations plus marks on the paper for shape locations. Then I remove a section at a time, add acrylic medium for “glue” and weight it down. This is where those old phone books come in handy.

This is the view of Woodcreek Ranch from my studio window. It’s what I see while I wait for the glue to dry.

Woodcreek Ranch - winter

Woodcreek Ranch – winter

 

I return to the collage and repeat the process of removing, gluing, weighting down and staring. Until it’s finished.

Untitled #1282 collage, 22x30", 2014

Untitled #1282 collage, 22×30″, 2014

There you have it!

You can see more of my collages on my website www.studio7310.com. Click on Tabs “New Work” and “Collages.”

Eye On Iceland

It is winter now in Iceland, but it will be spring before you know it and you’ll want to go there, so let me tell you what it is like when the days are long and it warms up (sort of).

Once again, we traveled with Overseas Adventure Travel. We went last May, an “iffy” month, still cold and often rainy, but fewer tourists. A good trade off. We began in the capital, Reykjavik, traveled along the southern coastline, up along the west side and across the northern edge. There was a lot of looping in and around since that’s the geography of the coast.

Reykajavik has about two thirds of the country’s 320,000 people, which makes Iceland a country of towns and villages more than cities.  Reykjavik’s newest addition, sitting right on the waterfront, is a stunning concert hall called Harpa, designed by Olafur Eliasson. This multi million dollar performance hall almost went belly up when Iceland went bankrupt but, lo and behold, funds were found to complete the project. This probably falls under the heading of “don’t ask, don’t tell.”

I’m glad they finished Harpa. Its facades of windows are spectacular even on a gloomy day. Inside or out, the struts and glass sections create amazing patterns.

IMG_2625 HarpaIMG_2632 Reykjavik Harpa

IMG_2609 Harpa

We spent a lot of time outdoors. The Snaefellsnes Peninsula gave us rain, wind and cold, but we could tell spring was approaching. The grass got greener and brave little flowers poked through the ground on the cliffs above the water.

IMG_2784 Snaefellsnes PeninsulaIMG_2789 Snaefellsnes Ntl. Park cliffsIMG_2808 Snaefellsnes Ntl. Pk

We had sunny weather on the day we visited a horse farm. The Icelandic horse is short, stocky and sturdy. And friendly. And cute!

IMG_2982  Icelandic Horse

This girl was more enamored of the flowers than the horses. I guess she’s used to them (the horses).

IMG_2953 Young Girl

Up and around we went to Akureyri, only forty miles from the Arctic Circle. A beautiful place.

IMG_3003 Akureyri

Waterfalls, craters and volcanic rock are plentiful throughout Iceland.

IMG_3029 Lake Myvten areaIMG_3035 Skutustadir cratersIMG_3040 Skutustadir cratersIMG_3048 Dimmuborgir volcanic rocks

Siglufjordur Village is Iceland’s most northerly town. Its promo name is Siglo (for those of us who are language challenged). It has a lively waterfront. We had sun!

IMG_3107 SiglocopyIMG_3109 SigloIMG_3120 Siglo

More beauty in Thingvellir National Park.

IMG_3156 Thingvellir Ntl.PkIMG_3179 Thingvellir Ntl Pk

More waterfalls in Gulfoss and Seljalandsfoss.

IMG_3221 Gulfoss WaterfallIMG_3316 Seljalandsfoss Waterfall

Craters and hot springs in Geysir. The underground hot springs throughout the country provide Icelanders with almost all their energy (thermal). Also, volcanic eruptions!

IMG_3191 Geysir

Glacier hikes are popular. We put on crampons and “walked” (carefully) on the Solheimajokull Glacier, whose volcanic debris made the surface less than pristine. Here is my color photo in black and white sans Photoshop. I kid you not.

IMG_3273 Glacier

Before returning to Reykjavik we drove past farmland definitely showing signs of spring.

IMG_3247 Golden Circle route

A last look at Reykjavik from atop its striking Lutheran church.

STA_2684Reykyavik Panorama

Arkansas Has Art

Nestled in the Ozarks, in the northeast corner of Arkansas, is Bentonville which I’m sure you know is where Sam Walton started Walmart all those many years ago. Bentonville’s latest claim to fame is the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, founded and funded by Sam Walton’s daughter, Alice with a major endowment by the Walton Family Foundation. Fall- a good time to take a drive to Arkansas.

The museum, designed by Moshe Safdie, is set in a natural ravine surrounded by mature native trees, stone walls and creeks. The multi building museum straddles two ponds whose water flow comes from Town Branch Creek and Crystal Spring. Water is an integral part of the design. The materials, concrete, glass, wood and steel complement each other nicely. The natural and man-made are well integrated.

Crystal Bridges

Crystal Bridges

The museum’s restaurant, Eleven, has better than average food. The stunner is a curved wood ceiling that echoes the exterior metal roof.

Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art 

Crystal Bridges-Reflections

Crystal Bridges-Reflections

 

Crystal Bridges-Roof

Crystal Bridges-Roof

Restaurant Eleven

Restaurant Eleven

The art collection, from the Colonial era to contemporary art is quite good. There are some well-known American artists, some not so well known (by me). I thought the contemporary art was quite good. Ms. Walton probably needed more mega-millions to buy enough top quality art to fill the museum.

The more than 100 acres surrounding the museum are an added treat with walking paths/trails that loop around and connect with each other for several miles.

Crystal Bridges trail

Crystal Bridges trail 

Large-scale sculpture is placed at intervals along the trails. Some like the Mark di Suvero can also be seen from one of the inside galleries, giving one a different perspective.

Mark di Suvero "Lowell's Ocean" 2005-2008 steel

Mark di Suvero “Lowell’s Ocean” 2005-2008 steel  

This welded and polished sculpture “Yield” by Roxy Paine is at one of the entrances. There is a similar piece (same series) at the Ft. Worth Modern. Here it is on a bright fall day.

Roxy Paine "Yield" 2011 stainless steel

Roxy Paine “Yield” 2011 stainless steel

Some art sneaks up on you like Robert Tannen’s “Grains of Sand.” He has placed fifteen boulders of native limestone and sandstone with aluminum numbers and ART on them along the trails. Finding all fifteen was a challenge we were not up for. We did find this one.

Robert Tannen "Grains of Sand" 2011 native stone and cast aluminum

Robert Tannen “Grains of Sand” 2011 native stone and cast aluminum

A short walk from the museum, near the town square, is another recent addition to Bentonville, the 21c. Museum Hotel. As it’s name implies, it is a combination of a contemporary (comfortable and spacious) hotel and museum. The museum has 21st century art with intriguing site specific and rotating temporary exhibits. The inside/outside areas with a lot of square feet are open to the public 24/7. You do need your room key to access the art on the upper floors. Here are a few pieces from “Outside/In: Site-specific art at 21c. Museum Hotel, Bentonville.

Chris Doyle "Unfolded" 2010-2013 wallpaper

Chris Doyle “Unfolded” 2010-2013 wallpaper

 

Serkan Ozkaya "A Sudden Gust of Wind Bentonville" 2013 metallic sheets, monofilament

Serkan Ozkaya “A Sudden Gust of Wind Bentonville” 2013 metallic sheets, monofilament 

The temporary exhibit during our stay was “Transporting Transformation: Cuba, In and Out.” The artists in this multi media exhibit deal with political, social and economic issues surrounding their identity and experiences.

At the hotel’s entrance, on the plaza, sits this 1950’s Plymouth. It’s thought provoking, to say the least. What were those people looking for?

DSC_7555

Inside is a video lounge (this hotel has everything). Currently showing is Sandra Ramos’ 3D animations.

Sandra Ramos 3D annimation

Sandra Ramos 3D animation

Carlos Garaicoa’s “El Mapo del Viajero ll”, a wall installation of pushpins and strips of paper with quotations from travel writings, draws you in to read the tiny writing. Or, you can stand back and appreciate the patterns on the wall.

Carlos Garaicoa "El Mapa del Viajero II" pushpins, strips of paper

Carlos Garaicoa “El Mapa del Viajero II” pushpins, strips of paper

Perhaps the wildest piece, made of found objects (blown glass, crystals and wigs), is “Perfect From Now On” by Amelia Biewald. Lit up at night, the shadows caught my attention.

Amelia Biewald "Perfect From Now On" 2010 13 chandeliers, blown glass, crystals, wigs

Amelia Biewald “Perfect From Now On” 2010 13 chandeliers, blown glass, crystals, wigs

Amelia Biewald "Perfect From Now On"

Amelia Biewald “Perfect From Now On” 

The “Green (color and recycled material) Penguin Flock”, the hotel’s mascots, show up in unexpected places. A whimsical touch, me thinks.

IMG_4176 21c.Museum Hotel

We came for the Crystal Bridges Museum. The 21c. Museum Hotel was a delightful surprise. Serendipity!